Latest Tweet

1
New Arrivals: First Edition of ICEPICK: A NOVEL ABOUT LIFE AND DEATH IN A MAXIMUM SECURITY PRISON (1974).  Inscribed by the author with an added drawing.  $125
Dobler’s second book, a novlized account of the five months he spent touring and visiting various prisons within the Illinois penal system, interviewing and speaking with everyone from convicts to prison staff.  An uncommon title inscribed.  

New Arrivals: First Edition of ICEPICK: A NOVEL ABOUT LIFE AND DEATH IN A MAXIMUM SECURITY PRISON (1974).  Inscribed by the author with an added drawing.  $125

Dobler’s second book, a novlized account of the five months he spent touring and visiting various prisons within the Illinois penal system, interviewing and speaking with everyone from convicts to prison staff.  An uncommon title inscribed.  

New Arrivals: Mary Ellen Shadd’s 1959 Negro Business Directory, State of Wisconsin. 6th Edition.
Milwaukee: Mary Ellen Shadd, 1959. Original illustrated card wrappers; 72pp; illus; adverts. Brief ink notation to front cover. Light external wear; still a clean, complete, VG copy.
Scarce Negro directory, issued by the publisher of the Milwaukee Defender, Wisconsin’s only black-owned paper. Includes hundreds of ads for black-owned businesses, nearly all in Milwaukee. Quite uncommon.

New Arrivals: Mary Ellen Shadd’s 1959 Negro Business Directory, State of Wisconsin. 6th Edition.

Milwaukee: Mary Ellen Shadd, 1959. Original illustrated card wrappers; 72pp; illus; adverts. Brief ink notation to front cover. Light external wear; still a clean, complete, VG copy.

Scarce Negro directory, issued by the publisher of the Milwaukee Defender, Wisconsin’s only black-owned paper. Includes hundreds of ads for black-owned businesses, nearly all in Milwaukee. Quite uncommon.

A selection from our most recent catalog: First Edition of $TUD (1966) by Phil Andros (pseudonym of Samuel Morris Steward).
The first major work by Steward under his Phil Andros pseudonym, now considered a classic of gay literature.  Steward, who spent most of his adult life in Chicago, had a PhD in English and taught at a variety of institutions through the mid 1940’s.  He left academia and made a name for himself as one of the leading tattoo artists of his day, for a time serving as the official tattoo artist for the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club in the Bay Area.  He lived an open, renegade homosexual lifestyle, meticulously documenting his sexual conquests and escapades in diaries and a box marked “Stud File.”  After meeting Alfred Kinsey in 1949, he spent a number of years working for the Institute for Sex Research in an unofficial capacity, openly sharing the details of his sexual records and introducing Kinsey to large numbers of sexually active men in the Chicago area.  In 1966, thanks to changes in American publishing laws, he published $tud under the Guild Press imprint, a novel told in a series of 18 episodes.  It’s the story of “a cocky male hustler who made no bones about his illicit profession, nor his countless erotic encounters.”  Like his character, Steward was “a macho rebel and a proud gay man writing at a time when many similar stories were still drenched in shame and guilt” (Peters, Brooks. Lover Man: The Samuel Steward Story).  The rare dustjacket shows superb wraparound artwork, designed by homoerotic illustrator “Etienne” (pseud. of Dom Orejudos).  Though the book was reprinted in the early 1980’s by Alyson Books, the first edition is rare.

A selection from our most recent catalog: First Edition of $TUD (1966) by Phil Andros (pseudonym of Samuel Morris Steward).

The first major work by Steward under his Phil Andros pseudonym, now considered a classic of gay literature.  Steward, who spent most of his adult life in Chicago, had a PhD in English and taught at a variety of institutions through the mid 1940’s.  He left academia and made a name for himself as one of the leading tattoo artists of his day, for a time serving as the official tattoo artist for the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club in the Bay Area.  He lived an open, renegade homosexual lifestyle, meticulously documenting his sexual conquests and escapades in diaries and a box marked “Stud File.”  After meeting Alfred Kinsey in 1949, he spent a number of years working for the Institute for Sex Research in an unofficial capacity, openly sharing the details of his sexual records and introducing Kinsey to large numbers of sexually active men in the Chicago area.  In 1966, thanks to changes in American publishing laws, he published $tud under the Guild Press imprint, a novel told in a series of 18 episodes.  It’s the story of “a cocky male hustler who made no bones about his illicit profession, nor his countless erotic encounters.”  Like his character, Steward was “a macho rebel and a proud gay man writing at a time when many similar stories were still drenched in shame and guilt” (Peters, Brooks. Lover Man: The Samuel Steward Story).  The rare dustjacket shows superb wraparound artwork, designed by homoerotic illustrator “Etienne” (pseud. of Dom Orejudos).  Though the book was reprinted in the early 1980’s by Alyson Books, the first edition is rare.

One of the many superb items from our recent Catalog 19: First Edition of BANJO (1929), by Claude McKay.  In a lovely example of the dust jacket designed by Aaron Douglas.
"The story of a black, happy-go-lucky vagabond’s life among the drifters who live along the waterfront in Marseilles during the 1920’s; his friend, Ray, is his antithesis (and resembles the author), an intellectual in search of himself, a man who articulates McKay’s disillusionment with the Harlem Renaissance" (PERRY, Margaret. The Harlem Renaissance: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary, p.119).  An accurate social perspective of Negro life in southern France, drawn directly from McKay’s experience living in Marseilles.

One of the many superb items from our recent Catalog 19: First Edition of BANJO (1929), by Claude McKay.  In a lovely example of the dust jacket designed by Aaron Douglas.

"The story of a black, happy-go-lucky vagabond’s life among the drifters who live along the waterfront in Marseilles during the 1920’s; his friend, Ray, is his antithesis (and resembles the author), an intellectual in search of himself, a man who articulates McKay’s disillusionment with the Harlem Renaissance" (PERRY, Margaret. The Harlem Renaissance: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary, p.119).  An accurate social perspective of Negro life in southern France, drawn directly from McKay’s experience living in Marseilles.

A selection from our latest publishing effort, Catalog 19: a New York Black Yankees Negro League Pennant.
Original pennant for the New York Black Yankees, a prominent Negro League baseball team active in the Negro National League from 1936-1948.  The team was originally founded in Harlem as the Harlem Black Bombers in 1931 by financier James “Soldier Boy” Semler and dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.  The team was alternately based in New York City, Rochester, and Paterson, NJ, with notable players including Satchel Paige, Fats Jenkins, Ted “Double Duty” Radcliffe, and Willie Wells.  A rare and well preserved ephemeral survival of the Negro Leagues. 

A selection from our latest publishing effort, Catalog 19: a New York Black Yankees Negro League Pennant.

Original pennant for the New York Black Yankees, a prominent Negro League baseball team active in the Negro National League from 1936-1948.  The team was originally founded in Harlem as the Harlem Black Bombers in 1931 by financier James “Soldier Boy” Semler and dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.  The team was alternately based in New York City, Rochester, and Paterson, NJ, with notable players including Satchel Paige, Fats Jenkins, Ted “Double Duty” Radcliffe, and Willie Wells.  A rare and well preserved ephemeral survival of the Negro Leagues. 

1
A selection from our Catalog 19 (shipping tomorrow!) - PIECE NOW, PIECE NOW, an original lithographed poster, ca.1968-1970.
A striking poster, featuring two rifles with scopes at center, each with the slogan “PIECE NOW” directly above.  Likely produced during the late 1960’s as a play on the pacifist cry of “Peace Now,” so often heard during the anti-war rallies of that tumultuous period.  A scarce poster; we find no examples for sale in the trade (2014), with the only example known to us sold at Swann (2013).

A selection from our Catalog 19 (shipping tomorrow!) - PIECE NOW, PIECE NOW, an original lithographed poster, ca.1968-1970.

A striking poster, featuring two rifles with scopes at center, each with the slogan “PIECE NOW” directly above.  Likely produced during the late 1960’s as a play on the pacifist cry of “Peace Now,” so often heard during the anti-war rallies of that tumultuous period.  A scarce poster; we find no examples for sale in the trade (2014), with the only example known to us sold at Swann (2013).

3
From our upcoming Catalog 19: LIVING MY LIFE (1934) by Emma Goldman, inscribed by her on the front endpaper.
First one-volume edition of Goldman’s monumental autobiography, an undisputed high-spot of women’s writing and one of a few truly important 20th-century radical memoirs.Goldman was furious with Knopf for issuing the book in two volumes at the height of an economic depression, and considered the publication price of $7.50 to be exhorbitant. The book indeed sold poorly, despite strong reviews, and it has never been common.  Knopf issued the one-volume edition in 1934.  On February 1 the same year, after 15 years in exile, Goldman was re-admitted to the United States for a brief 90 day period, during which she lectured extensively.  The present copy was signed for Sabina Cohen of Rochester, NY, who attended a city club lecture with her husband Hyman in February, 1934.  A scarce title in dustjacket.  

From our upcoming Catalog 19: LIVING MY LIFE (1934) by Emma Goldman, inscribed by her on the front endpaper.

First one-volume edition of Goldman’s monumental autobiography, an undisputed high-spot of women’s writing and one of a few truly important 20th-century radical memoirs.Goldman was furious with Knopf for issuing the book in two volumes at the height of an economic depression, and considered the publication price of $7.50 to be exhorbitant. The book indeed sold poorly, despite strong reviews, and it has never been common.  Knopf issued the one-volume edition in 1934.  On February 1 the same year, after 15 years in exile, Goldman was re-admitted to the United States for a brief 90 day period, during which she lectured extensively.  The present copy was signed for Sabina Cohen of Rochester, NY, who attended a city club lecture with her husband Hyman in February, 1934.  A scarce title in dustjacket.