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One of the many superb items from our recent Catalog 19: First Edition of BANJO (1929), by Claude McKay.  In a lovely example of the dust jacket designed by Aaron Douglas.
"The story of a black, happy-go-lucky vagabond’s life among the drifters who live along the waterfront in Marseilles during the 1920’s; his friend, Ray, is his antithesis (and resembles the author), an intellectual in search of himself, a man who articulates McKay’s disillusionment with the Harlem Renaissance" (PERRY, Margaret. The Harlem Renaissance: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary, p.119).  An accurate social perspective of Negro life in southern France, drawn directly from McKay’s experience living in Marseilles.

One of the many superb items from our recent Catalog 19: First Edition of BANJO (1929), by Claude McKay.  In a lovely example of the dust jacket designed by Aaron Douglas.

"The story of a black, happy-go-lucky vagabond’s life among the drifters who live along the waterfront in Marseilles during the 1920’s; his friend, Ray, is his antithesis (and resembles the author), an intellectual in search of himself, a man who articulates McKay’s disillusionment with the Harlem Renaissance" (PERRY, Margaret. The Harlem Renaissance: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary, p.119).  An accurate social perspective of Negro life in southern France, drawn directly from McKay’s experience living in Marseilles.

A selection from our latest publishing effort, Catalog 19: a New York Black Yankees Negro League Pennant.
Original pennant for the New York Black Yankees, a prominent Negro League baseball team active in the Negro National League from 1936-1948.  The team was originally founded in Harlem as the Harlem Black Bombers in 1931 by financier James “Soldier Boy” Semler and dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.  The team was alternately based in New York City, Rochester, and Paterson, NJ, with notable players including Satchel Paige, Fats Jenkins, Ted “Double Duty” Radcliffe, and Willie Wells.  A rare and well preserved ephemeral survival of the Negro Leagues. 

A selection from our latest publishing effort, Catalog 19: a New York Black Yankees Negro League Pennant.

Original pennant for the New York Black Yankees, a prominent Negro League baseball team active in the Negro National League from 1936-1948.  The team was originally founded in Harlem as the Harlem Black Bombers in 1931 by financier James “Soldier Boy” Semler and dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.  The team was alternately based in New York City, Rochester, and Paterson, NJ, with notable players including Satchel Paige, Fats Jenkins, Ted “Double Duty” Radcliffe, and Willie Wells.  A rare and well preserved ephemeral survival of the Negro Leagues. 

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A selection from our Catalog 19 (shipping tomorrow!) - PIECE NOW, PIECE NOW, an original lithographed poster, ca.1968-1970.
A striking poster, featuring two rifles with scopes at center, each with the slogan “PIECE NOW” directly above.  Likely produced during the late 1960’s as a play on the pacifist cry of “Peace Now,” so often heard during the anti-war rallies of that tumultuous period.  A scarce poster; we find no examples for sale in the trade (2014), with the only example known to us sold at Swann (2013).

A selection from our Catalog 19 (shipping tomorrow!) - PIECE NOW, PIECE NOW, an original lithographed poster, ca.1968-1970.

A striking poster, featuring two rifles with scopes at center, each with the slogan “PIECE NOW” directly above.  Likely produced during the late 1960’s as a play on the pacifist cry of “Peace Now,” so often heard during the anti-war rallies of that tumultuous period.  A scarce poster; we find no examples for sale in the trade (2014), with the only example known to us sold at Swann (2013).

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From our upcoming Catalog 19: LIVING MY LIFE (1934) by Emma Goldman, inscribed by her on the front endpaper.
First one-volume edition of Goldman’s monumental autobiography, an undisputed high-spot of women’s writing and one of a few truly important 20th-century radical memoirs.Goldman was furious with Knopf for issuing the book in two volumes at the height of an economic depression, and considered the publication price of $7.50 to be exhorbitant. The book indeed sold poorly, despite strong reviews, and it has never been common.  Knopf issued the one-volume edition in 1934.  On February 1 the same year, after 15 years in exile, Goldman was re-admitted to the United States for a brief 90 day period, during which she lectured extensively.  The present copy was signed for Sabina Cohen of Rochester, NY, who attended a city club lecture with her husband Hyman in February, 1934.  A scarce title in dustjacket.  

From our upcoming Catalog 19: LIVING MY LIFE (1934) by Emma Goldman, inscribed by her on the front endpaper.

First one-volume edition of Goldman’s monumental autobiography, an undisputed high-spot of women’s writing and one of a few truly important 20th-century radical memoirs.Goldman was furious with Knopf for issuing the book in two volumes at the height of an economic depression, and considered the publication price of $7.50 to be exhorbitant. The book indeed sold poorly, despite strong reviews, and it has never been common.  Knopf issued the one-volume edition in 1934.  On February 1 the same year, after 15 years in exile, Goldman was re-admitted to the United States for a brief 90 day period, during which she lectured extensively.  The present copy was signed for Sabina Cohen of Rochester, NY, who attended a city club lecture with her husband Hyman in February, 1934.  A scarce title in dustjacket.  

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From our upcoming Catalog 19: The Complete Superspade Series (1970-71), by B.B. Johnson.
The complete adventures of Richard Abraham Spade, a Vietnam veteran and ex-pro footballer-turned-academic with “a face like a black Cary Grant and B.O. that drives women wild.”  Billed as a series of “tough guy” novels, clearly inspired by the success of Ernest Tidyman’s Shaft novels, Spade is something of a cross between Sam Spade and James Bond, with a little MacGyver thrown in for good measure.  Rear cover of each volume shows a black and white portrait of Johnson in sunglasses, smoking a pipe, with the caption “B.B. Johnson” is the pseudonym for one of Hollywood’s most talented and creative black personalities;” McIntyre hints that the series may have been “the work of a singular, but unknown, white hack.”  Cover art for all six volumes designed by Mitchell Hooks.

From our upcoming Catalog 19: The Complete Superspade Series (1970-71), by B.B. Johnson.

The complete adventures of Richard Abraham Spade, a Vietnam veteran and ex-pro footballer-turned-academic with “a face like a black Cary Grant and B.O. that drives women wild.”  Billed as a series of “tough guy” novels, clearly inspired by the success of Ernest Tidyman’s Shaft novels, Spade is something of a cross between Sam Spade and James Bond, with a little MacGyver thrown in for good measure.  Rear cover of each volume shows a black and white portrait of Johnson in sunglasses, smoking a pipe, with the caption “B.B. Johnson” is the pseudonym for one of Hollywood’s most talented and creative black personalities;” McIntyre hints that the series may have been “the work of a singular, but unknown, white hack.”  Cover art for all six volumes designed by Mitchell Hooks.

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Find of the week! This poster, and its affiliated handbill, were brought in to us today - issued by the Pittsburgh “Progressive Young Colored Democrats” in 1935 to promote the Senate candidacy of New Deal Democrat Joseph F. Guffey. The gala featured a free performance by the great stride pianist and band-leader Claude Hopkins. Such material, reflecting the beginning of the courtship of African-American voters by mainstream political parties, is extremely rare. This is a superb example, with a terrific jazz connection.  Find of the week! This poster, and its affiliated handbill, were brought in to us today - issued by the Pittsburgh “Progressive Young Colored Democrats” in 1935 to promote the Senate candidacy of New Deal Democrat Joseph F. Guffey. The gala featured a free performance by the great stride pianist and band-leader Claude Hopkins. Such material, reflecting the beginning of the courtship of African-American voters by mainstream political parties, is extremely rare. This is a superb example, with a terrific jazz connection. 

Find of the week! This poster, and its affiliated handbill, were brought in to us today - issued by the Pittsburgh “Progressive Young Colored Democrats” in 1935 to promote the Senate candidacy of New Deal Democrat Joseph F. Guffey. The gala featured a free performance by the great stride pianist and band-leader Claude Hopkins. Such material, reflecting the beginning of the courtship of African-American voters by mainstream political parties, is extremely rare. This is a superb example, with a terrific jazz connection. 

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New Arrivals: Poster - Women…our wounded need your care!…Join a hospital company.
Washington DC: Recruiting & Publicity Branch, U.S. Army, 1945. Original lithographed poster, 38”x25”. Printed in colors on heavy white poster-stock. Mild creasing along bottom margin (well away from image), else a fresh, unworn example, Near Fine / A-. Unbacked.  

Recruiting poster, dated January, 1945, for the medical section of the Women’s Army Corps (WACs). The illustration, excellent but unattributed, depicts a svelte Army nurse in a sharply pleated (and rather fetching) blue uniform - shades of Madison Avenue and the Fifties fashion revolution to come. The WACs provided an important point of entry for women into the post-war professional workforce, expanding their roles beyond traditional palliative nursing duties; the current poster is particularly interesting for its promise of providing skilled technical training in the areas of medical and surgical technology.

New Arrivals: Poster - Women…our wounded need your care!…Join a hospital company.

Washington DC: Recruiting & Publicity Branch, U.S. Army, 1945. Original lithographed poster, 38”x25”. Printed in colors on heavy white poster-stock. Mild creasing along bottom margin (well away from image), else a fresh, unworn example, Near Fine / A-. Unbacked.  

Recruiting poster, dated January, 1945, for the medical section of the Women’s Army Corps (WACs). The illustration, excellent but unattributed, depicts a svelte Army nurse in a sharply pleated (and rather fetching) blue uniform - shades of Madison Avenue and the Fifties fashion revolution to come. The WACs provided an important point of entry for women into the post-war professional workforce, expanding their roles beyond traditional palliative nursing duties; the current poster is particularly interesting for its promise of providing skilled technical training in the areas of medical and surgical technology.

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todayinlaborhistory:

Today in labor history, July 6, 1889: Striking laborers employed by contractors on street and sewer improvements in Duluth, Minnesota, attempt to break through the police presence protecting scabs doing their work. The police opened fire and a gun battle ensued that resulted in the deaths of four workers and a bystander; many more were seriously wounded. The state militia was called in and drove the workers back with fixed bayonets. Strike leaders were arrested and the police who participated were given gold medals.

todayinlaborhistory:

Today in labor history, July 6, 1889: Striking laborers employed by contractors on street and sewer improvements in Duluth, Minnesota, attempt to break through the police presence protecting scabs doing their work. The police opened fire and a gun battle ensued that resulted in the deaths of four workers and a bystander; many more were seriously wounded. The state militia was called in and drove the workers back with fixed bayonets. Strike leaders were arrested and the police who participated were given gold medals.

New Arrivals: Poster - Can You Imagine?…They Are Your G.I. Joes In Action…Right In Your Own Home!  N.p. [Amsterdam: ca 1967?]. Original lithographed poster, 27-3/4” x 18”. Printed in colors on heavy coated stock. Mild soiling, surface-rippling, and creasing; no losses or folds; Very Good Plus / B+. Unbacked.  
Antiwar poster of unknown origin, taken from a Dutch collection. The imagery is certainly reminiscent of Amsterdam avant-garde graphics of the Sixties era, featuring a large, bloody single-word slogan, “Viet”, superimposed on a montage of “G.I. Joe” images and comic-book clippings. An uncommon and graphically sophisticated poster; not catalogued, so far as we can determine, in any of the standard anthologies of Vietnam-era political poster art, and not found in the catalog of any OCLC member institution.

New Arrivals: Poster - Can You Imagine?…They Are Your G.I. Joes In Action…Right In Your Own Home!  N.p. [Amsterdam: ca 1967?]. Original lithographed poster, 27-3/4” x 18”. Printed in colors on heavy coated stock. Mild soiling, surface-rippling, and creasing; no losses or folds; Very Good Plus / B+. Unbacked.  

Antiwar poster of unknown origin, taken from a Dutch collection. The imagery is certainly reminiscent of Amsterdam avant-garde graphics of the Sixties era, featuring a large, bloody single-word slogan, “Viet”, superimposed on a montage of “G.I. Joe” images and comic-book clippings. An uncommon and graphically sophisticated poster; not catalogued, so far as we can determine, in any of the standard anthologies of Vietnam-era political poster art, and not found in the catalog of any OCLC member institution.

A gem from our soon-to-be-released Catalog 19: First Edition of WOMEN AS SEX VENDORS or WHY WOMEN ARE CONSERVATIVE (BEING A VIEW OF THE ECONOMIC STATUS OF WOMEN), by R.B. Tobias and Mary E. Marcy (1918).
Top 5 Favorite Quotes (it was hard to only pick 5…this book is a gift that just keeps on giving):
1. “There is no office or saloon scrub-woman so displeasing and decrepit, no stenographer so old and so unattractive, no dish-washer so sodden, that she does not know, tucked far away in her inner consciousness, perhaps, that, if the very worst comes and she loses her job, there is the truck driver or the office clerk, the shaky-legged bar patron on the road to early locomotor ataxia, or the squint-eyed out-of-town salesman, who can be counted on to tide her over an emergency - usually for goods delivered” (p.13-14).
2. “When a man is out of a job and broke, he is flat on his back…When a woman loses a job, she has always the sale of her sex to fall back upon as a last resort” (p.14).
3. “Among men, the possession of, and ability to support a woman in perpetuity, whom no other may touch, is honorific, a high sign of display.  It announces to the world that such a man is able to hold a trophy in the struggle for existence.  A monogamous wife is, in fact, an emblem of well-off-ness, and greatly to be desired” (p.22).
4. “Nearly every ordinary woman under ninety, hopes some day to find a man who will marry her and support her for the rest of her days.  Instead of fitting herself for a trade or a profession, young women, and old women, devote their time to schemes for prevailing upon some man, to pay the ultimate price and marry them” (p.24-25).
5. “Listen to a group of boys talking among themselves.  You will probably add some useful knowledge to your mental equipment, for you will hear them discussing feats in civil engineering, problems in electricity, mechanics, physics, chemistry, surgery, as well as events in the world of sports.  On the other hand, the conversations among girls are almost entirely on the subject of boys, men, clothes and the theatre” (p.32-33).

A gem from our soon-to-be-released Catalog 19: First Edition of WOMEN AS SEX VENDORS or WHY WOMEN ARE CONSERVATIVE (BEING A VIEW OF THE ECONOMIC STATUS OF WOMEN), by R.B. Tobias and Mary E. Marcy (1918).

Top 5 Favorite Quotes (it was hard to only pick 5…this book is a gift that just keeps on giving):

1. “There is no office or saloon scrub-woman so displeasing and decrepit, no stenographer so old and so unattractive, no dish-washer so sodden, that she does not know, tucked far away in her inner consciousness, perhaps, that, if the very worst comes and she loses her job, there is the truck driver or the office clerk, the shaky-legged bar patron on the road to early locomotor ataxia, or the squint-eyed out-of-town salesman, who can be counted on to tide her over an emergency - usually for goods delivered” (p.13-14).

2. “When a man is out of a job and broke, he is flat on his back…When a woman loses a job, she has always the sale of her sex to fall back upon as a last resort” (p.14).

3. “Among men, the possession of, and ability to support a woman in perpetuity, whom no other may touch, is honorific, a high sign of display.  It announces to the world that such a man is able to hold a trophy in the struggle for existence.  A monogamous wife is, in fact, an emblem of well-off-ness, and greatly to be desired” (p.22).

4. “Nearly every ordinary woman under ninety, hopes some day to find a man who will marry her and support her for the rest of her days.  Instead of fitting herself for a trade or a profession, young women, and old women, devote their time to schemes for prevailing upon some man, to pay the ultimate price and marry them” (p.24-25).

5. “Listen to a group of boys talking among themselves.  You will probably add some useful knowledge to your mental equipment, for you will hear them discussing feats in civil engineering, problems in electricity, mechanics, physics, chemistry, surgery, as well as events in the world of sports.  On the other hand, the conversations among girls are almost entirely on the subject of boys, men, clothes and the theatre” (p.32-33).